Water for Tomorrow: Working together to create and test innovative and holistic water management solutions

The european project Water for Tomorrow aims to improve water management in England and France.
17 August 2021
Logo INTERREG VA France (Channel) England

INTERREG VA France (Channel) England logo.

© INTERREG

Issues and needs

Water for Tomorrow is a cross-border partnership of 5 organisations in England and France which will develop and test innovative water management tools and decision-making support systems. These will enable more responsive short-term management of drought events, and better long-term planning, as well as investment in water management at a local scale.

This €4 million project is funded through the EU INTERREG VA France (Channel) England Programme which has committed €2.8million through the European Development Fund. The project will run until March 2023.

Banner Water for Tomorrow.

Banner Water for Tomorrow.

© Water for Tomorrow

Expected results

The deliverables are as follows:

  • New data collection methods, hydro-economic models and new software to improve water allocation and early warning of water scarcity.
  • Multi sector collaboration that supports the uptake and roll out of these systems and use of smart technologies in the management of water resources across the FCE area.

Five pilot sites have been defined, three in England and two in France:

  • Broadland Rivers, England
  • Cam & Ely Ouse, England
  • East Suffolk, England
  • Sud Finistère, France
  • CABBALR, France

BRGM's role

BRGM Brittany has expertise and advanced skills in the study and management of groundwater and other associated hydraulic compartments. The “New Water Resources and Economy” division in Montpellier, also involved in the Water for Tomorrow project, makes it possible to develop appropriate economic approaches to meet the new needs of integrated water management and more generally of the environment and geo-resources.

Granite boulder, Finistère

"Sud Finistère" pilot site

This pilot site is home to several stakeholder groups making use of the drinking water supply: agriculture (livestock), industry, a growing tourism industry, and a growing population, linked to coastalisation.

Water for Tomorrow - South Finistère pilot site: securing the drinking water supply

How can we act collectively to tackle water scarcity? The European project Water for Tomorrow aims to improve water management in England and France. South Finistère is one of the 5 pilot sites of the project.

© BRGM

The Syndicat Mixte de l'Aulne (SMA) plays a role in assuring the security of the drinking water supply (AEP) to the South-Western quarter of the Finistère (Brittany). It covers an area of 1300km² and includes 5 EPCI’s, which combine nearly 180,000 users, and will soon expand to a 6th EPCI. Each of these areas has its own resources and calls on the SMA for permanent supply or for ad-hoc security.

This pilot site is home to several stakeholder groups making use of the drinking water supply: agriculture (livestock), industry, a growing tourism industry, and a growing population, linked to coastalisation. These growing needs are coupled with a decrease in the availability of water resources and it is possible that the AEP networks will not be able to meet everyone’s needs in the future.

The multitude of sampling points and the collective security role of the SMA justify thinking about the sustainable management of resources in an all-round way on this pilot site, for greater efficiency.

View of fields, Picardy

"CABBALR" pilot site

CABBALR is therefore seeking to better predict the future evolution of water resources and needs in order to integrate them into its area development strategy.

Water has not been a major concern historically on the pilot site of CABBALR, due to the abundance from one of Europe’s largest aquifers (La nappe the la Craie) and a variety of water management authorities in the area.

Nonetheless, droughts from 2017 to 2019 have led to a decline in piezometric levels, which could be sustained with climate change. At the same time, uses are changing: there is an increased demand for water by the agricultural sector, industrial areas are expanding, as is urbanization.

CABBALR is therefore seeking to better predict the future evolution of water resources and needs in order to integrate them into its area development strategy and better prepare for emergency situations.